Monday Bridge 10 February 2020

Hi All,

A drizzly day, but 10 nice tables. Congratulations to Nancy and Bill (69%) and Sid and Carol (60%) for high scores for the day. You've all done very well.

Next week we'll start the One-of-a-Suit Opening Worksheet. Be prepared to discuss.

Next Thursday at 10:30 the Master Class on Defense will feature Plays in Third Seat.

Check back tomorrow and Wednesday for comments on today's boards.

Dave 

PS  Comments added to boards 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16 and 17. 








East opens 1 Club and South overcalls 1 Heart. West responds 1 Spade, promising 5 or more Spades, 6 or more points and forcing partner to describe. North competes with 2 Hearts. East reevaluates in support of Spades as 18 points and jumps to 3 Spades to invite game. South reevaluates in Hearts as 18 points and competes to 4 Hearts. West reevaluates to 14 points in Spades, sees a total of 31 points or more and bids 4 No Trump, Blackwood, to check the Aces. East bids 5 Spades to show 3 Aces and West raises to 6 Spades. 

North will probably lead a Heart, but it doesn't matter. Declarer will discard a Club on the Ace of Hearts, force out the trumps and take 5 Spades, 1 Heart, 4 Diamonds, a Diamond ruff and 1 Club for his contract.

No one bid the slam. It looks like a case of the reevaluation blues.




East passes and South opens 1 Club. West can neither double nor overcall, so must pass. North responds 1 Spade and South reevaluates to 17 points and invites with 3 Spades. North reevaluates to 14 points, sees a total of 31 points or more and bids 4 No Trump, Blackwood, to check the Aces. South bids 5 Diamonds to show 1 Ace and North settles for 5 Spades. Donna took 11 tricks, but they're more likely to go down. 

Sometimes the pajama bids get the tops, sometimes they get the bottoms!







This is a tough hand in which to get the best results. North counts 25 HCPs, but downgrades the King of Clubs to 24 points. He thinks about the 2 Club forcing opening. He doesn't have a balanced to rebid No Trump, and has 3 4-card suits to choose from. Lesson 4 specifies 21 points with a 6-card suit, 23 points with a 6-card suit and 25 with a 5-card suit. Is there an option?

He thinks about opening 1 Diamond and then jump-shifting to one of his 4-card majors to force to game. This is a more flexible approach to find a suit fit, but there is always the danger that partner might have to pass. He thinks some more.

He boils it down to 3 choices. He can bid 1 Diamond, hoping that partner can respond and they find a suit fit and make game. He can bid 2 Clubs and rebid 3 No Trump, hoping that partner has something in Clubs. He can bid 2 Clubs and rebid one of his 4-card suits, hoping to find a suit fit. 

I like 1 Diamond because you don't have to lie and it is least likely to lead to a disaster. In this worst case you make 1 Diamond with overtricks for a decent score. 

Option 2 leads to a disaster when partner has no Club help and you go down. 

Option 3 requires a good guess when you rebid one of your 4-card suits. A guess of 2 Diamonds or 2 hearts, will lead to disaster. Partner will assume that you have at least a 5-card suit and take you to game, which will fail. A fortunate guess of 2 Spades will lead to success. Partner will again assume that you have at least a 5-card suit and take you to game, which will make for a top.

These are classic bad hands and, in the long run, discipline will prevail.




Let's suppose East opens 1 Club with his 13 HCPs, flat hand and 4 Quacks. South will pass and West will respond 1 Heart. East rebids 1 Spade and West must choose between 3 hearts, promising a 6-card suit and 10 or more points and 2 No Trump promising 11 -12 HCPs and stoppers in the unbid suit. Not an easy choice.

Let's suppose instead that East passes. South will probably pass again and West will open 1 Heart. East will see game in Hearts, but wonders about slam. He responds 1 Spade to force partner to describe and will go to 4 Hearts when West shows his minimum with 1 No Trump. Easier.




No pairs bid a slam. Could they?

East passes and South opens a weak 2 Spades. West counts 20 points at least and doubles. East counts 11 points and stops to ponder his advance. He would normally jump with 9-12 points, but that takes him to 4 Hearts and partner may have only 13. On the other hand, he would bid 3 Hearts with no points and they may miss a game. He decides to show his strength and good suit with 4 Hearts.

West stops to reevaluate and think. He decides to consider his Clubs as self-supporting and reevaluates as 25 points opposite 9-12. He's interested in slam, but needs to know about the Ace or King of Hearts. They haven't overtly agreed on a suit, so would partner take 4 No Trump as Blackwood or to play? If he does show 1 Ace, it might be the useless Ace of Spades. He decides to invite with 5 Hearts and let partner decide. East reevaluates in Hearts as 12 points, a maximum, and has the Ace so raises to 6 Hearts. 

South will lead the Ace of Spades and declarer will ruff in dummy and sees at least 3 Heart tricks, the Spade ruff, 1 Diamond and 7 Clubs. North is likely to hold the King of Hearts, given South's weak-two bid, so declarer runs dummy's Queen, continues to drop the King and has 13 tricks.








West opens 1 Diamond and North overcalls 2 Spades, weak. East wants to get to game, but isn't sure where. He responds 3 Hearts to show 5 Hearts, 10 or more points and force opener to describe his hand. West has 14 points and knows that his Heart support makes partner stronger. He raises to 4 Hearts and makes an overtrick for a good score. 

Dellen and Rosemarie got to 3 No Trump and made 2 overtricks for the top. You'll have to ask them how they got there.








South counts 20 points, 1 short for 2 Clubs. He opens 1 Diamond and North responds 1 Spade. South can't bid anything that partner can pass and doesn't like jump-shifting to his 3-card major. He decides that the Diamonds are self-supporting and reevaluates to 24 points opposite partner's 6 or more. He jumps to 5 Diamonds and it makes for a good score. This time Bobbie Sue got to 3 No Trump and made overtricks for the top. I don't see how they got there either.




This time only 2 pairs got to game. How should this one go?

West opens 1 Diamond and East wants to get to game, but isn't sure where. He responds 1 Spade to force partner to describe his hand. West rebids 2 Clubs to show his 2 suits and 13-18 points. East hasn't seen anything to make him think about slam and has no forcing bid, so must place the game at 5 Diamonds or 3 No Trump. Nancy chose 3 No Trump like most veteran players and got an overtrick for the top.




North opens 1 Diamond and South thinks No Trump, but can't deny his 4-card major. He bids 1 Heart to force partner to describe. North must rebid 1 No Trump, denying a 4-card major and showing 13 -16 points. South jumps to 3 No Trump and it makes with an overtrick for a good score. Jane found a second overtrick  for the top.





Games everywhere with 19 HCPs opposite 10. East opens 1 Diamond and West responds 1 Spade. East rebids 2 No Trump and West raises to game. If you missed this one, review lesson 3.




East stops to consider whether to bid a thin 1 Spade or a fat 2 Spades. If he opens 1 Spade, West sees game with his 14 points and 3-card support. He responds 2 Diamonds to force partner to describe his hand. East will rebid 2 Spades to show 13-16 and a 6-card suit. West will raise to 4 Spades and maybe make it for a good score. Vivian found an overtrick for the top.

If East opens 2 Spades, West will probably pass and they'll make it with a couple of overtricks for a decent score. West might bid 2 No Trump to ask if partner has a good hand, a good suit and a feature. East will respond 3 No Trump to promise the Ace-King-Queen of his suit. West will pass and make it for a good score.








Another choice between a minor and No Trump. Let's see how this one goes.

West passes with his flat 12 and North opens 1 Heart. South responds 2 Clubs and North thinks about 3 No Trump, but must describe his hand with 2 Diamonds to show his two suits and 13-18 points. South jumps to 3 Diamonds to show the fit. North now must choose between 3 No Trump and 5 Diamonds and like most veteran players chooses 3 No Trump. It makes with an overtrick for a good score and Sid found a second overtrick for the top.




East opens 1 Diamond and West responds 1 Heart. East jumps to 3 Diamonds to show his 6 or more Diamonds and 17 or more points. West counts 12 points in support of Diamonds and knows that his support makes partner stronger. He sees a good fit with 32 points or more, so considers Blackwood. If partner responds 5 Diamonds to show one Ace, he can pass. If partner shows two or three Aces, he'll bid 6 Diamonds. And so it goes. West jumps to 4 No Trump and East responds 5 Spades to show his 3 Aces. West bids the slam as planned. 

Whatever South leads, declarer will take 6 Diamonds, 2 Hearts, 1 Club, 2 Spades and a Spade ruff for the slam and the top.