Monday Bridge 22 July 2019

Hi All,

The threat of rain brought out a good game with 11 tables. Congratulations to Louise and Cal for a hot 69% and Karin and Carol for a nice 63% for high scores for the day. You've all done very well.

Next Monday we'll start the Competitive Bidding worksheet. Good practice. There is no advanced lesson scheduled for Thursday.

Check back tomorrow and Wednesday for comments on today's boards.

See you soon.

Dave

PS  Comments added to boards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19 and 20.








It floats to West who opens 1 Heart. East reevaluates to 13 points so is too strong for the limit raise. He knows that he wants to be in game, but can't be sure of slam, so bids 2 Clubs to force partner to describe his hand. West jump-shifts to 3 Diamonds to show his two suits, 19 or more points and force to game. East stops to think again. He sees a good fit and knows that his Heart support makes partner stronger. He now sees at least 20 points opposite his 13 and jumps to 4 No Trump, Blackwood. West bids 5 Spades to show his 3 Aces and East bids 6 hearts. It makes with an overtrick for a good score, but Dellen and Rosemarie bid No Trump for the top.



Turnabout is fair play and this time N/S get the big hands. South opens 1 Heart and North responds 1 Spade to force partner to describe his hand. South rebids 3 Hearts to show his 6-card suit and 17 or more points. North has 13 points and knows that his Heart support gives partner 20 points or more. He jumps to 4 No Trump, Blackwood, and when partner bids 5 Spades to show 3 Aces, he bids 6 Hearts. It makes with an overtrick and this time gets the top.




Three big hands in a row! This time West opens 2 Clubs with his 23 HCPs. East thinks slam right away and bids 2 Diamonds to see what partner has. West rebids 2 No Trump and East knows that they have the points for Slam and wants to check the Aces with Gerber. With their 34-36 HCPs, the opponents can't have 2 Aces, but it would be nice to know if they have them all. 

East stops to consider whether to check for a Spade fit with Stayman. If he bids 3 Clubs, Stayman, partner might bid 3 Spades and the suit contract might be better than No Trump. If partner bids 3 Diamonds or 3 Hearts, however, It might make 4 No Trump ambiguous and he would probably just bid 6 No Trumps to avoid any confusion.

Fortunately, all paths lead to 6 No Trump and it's merely a race for the overtrick to win the top.




East opens 2 No Trump and West stops to think. He has enough for 3 Notrump and slam is unlikely, but should he check for a Heart fit? It might be safer and 4 Hearts scores better than 3 No Trump. Most Wests just bid 3 No Trump and made an overtrick for a mediocre score. Carol and Suzanne made an extra overtrick for a good score. Louise and Cal chose Hearts and made an extra overtrick for the top that helped them win the day.




This can be a tough hand. If South passes, West will open 1 No Trump and East will bid 2 Diamonds, the Jacoby transfer. West will rebid 2 Hearts, as directed, and East will pass. It will make with overtricks for a decent score.

If South opens 1 Spade, however, West can't overcall 1 No Trump with no Spade stopper. An overcall of 2 Clubs is unattractive, so he might double. North reevaluates to 10 points with his good support, so will redouble. East will advance 2 Hearts or 2 Diamonds and South will stop to think. He hesitates to rebid 2 Spades with his 5-card suit. Partner has promised 10 points, but not necessarily Spade support. He doesn't want to rebid 3 Clubs since that would be a reverse and promise extra values. He doesn't want to let the opponents play in either Hearts or Diamonds, so will probably rebid 2 Spades anyway.

West hasn't the 17 points to bid after his double and East will pass, so West must lead. If he leads the Ace of Clubs and continues with another, East will ruff and lead the Queen of Diamonds. East will take South's King on the first or second Diamond and lead another Club for partner to ruff. They also get the Ace of Hearts and the second diamond for down 1. Most anything else will allow declarer to make his contract for a decent score.

One pair bid and made 3 No Trump, but the less said about that, the better.




South opens 1 No Trump and North stops to think. He has 10 HCPs which is enough for 3 No Trump, but worries about the Spades. He ponders an invitational 3 Diamonds or to just bid 5 Diamonds, but 11 tricks looks far away. He decides to just do it and bids 3 No Trump. It makes with an overtrick (or two) for a good score.








East opens 1 Spade and West stops to reevaluate and think. He now sees a good fit and 10 points opposite partner's opening, so jumps to 3 Spades, the limit raise. East reevaluates to 20 points and ponders slam. His options are to jump to 4 No Trump to check the Aces and assume partner has a maximum or to jump to 5 Spades to check for extra values and assume partner has an Ace.

East will probably just bid the reasonably sure 4 Spades and make an overtrick for the top.




East opens 1 Club and South has 14 HCPs, but can neither overcall nor double. West responds 1 Heart and East rebids 1 Spade. West doesn't want to show preference for Clubs or Spades, so rebids 1 No Trump. All pass and declarer makes it for a decent score.

If South foolishly enters the auction, they will go down enough to give E/W a better score.
















West opens 1 Spade and East responds 1 No Trump. West rebids 2 Diamonds and East shows preference by passing. It should make some number of overtricks for a decent score, but the pairs who somehow stayed in Spades did better. Ugly hand.




South opens 1 No Trump and North has enough for game with his 11 HCPs. He stops to consider whether to just bid 3 No Trump or to look for a Spade fit. If he chooses 3 No Trump, It should make, but today's players had trouble.

If North decides to bid 2 Clubs, Stayman, to look for a Spade fit, South will rebid 2 Hearts or 2 Spades as he chooses. If 2 Spades, North will raise to 4 Spades. It should make, but at least one pair had trouble. If instead 2 Hearts, North will bid 3 No Trump and South will pass or correct to 4 Spades.

It seems that South should make 3 Spades, 3 Hearts, 1 Diamond and 3 Clubs in any case. Figure out how.








South opens 1 Heart and North will respond 2 Hearts to limit his hand with his minimum. South will rebid 4 Hearts and it makes for the top when no one makes the overtrick.

If North bids 1 Spade to force partner to describe his hand, South will jump-shift to 3 Diamonds to show his two suits, 19 or more points and to force to game. North will raise to 4 Hearts with the same results as above.

To insure a top, you need the overtrick. It looks to be pretty straightforward to ruff a Diamond in dummy before you give up a trump to West.




North must pass with only 5 sure tricks and East opens 1 Diamond. West responds 1 Spade and East jumps to 3 Spades to show the fit and 17 or more points. West raises to 4 Spades and it makes an overtrick for a good score.








South opens 1 Club and North responds 1 Heart. South raises to 2 Hearts and North stops to reevaluate and think. He now sees 23 points opposite partner's opening hand and is interested in slam. He has the points, but needs to know about the Aces. He's concerned about the Clubs in any case, so ponders whether to use Blackwood to see if he has both missing Aces or to use control bids. 

Suppose North decides to bid 3 Diamonds to deny the Aces of Spades and Clubs and to ask partner to show an Ace. South bids 3 Spades to show that Ace and North still is worried about Clubs. He rebids 5 Hearts to show no other first round controls. He hopes partner will show first round control of Clubs or just bid 6 Hearts if he has it. If South passes they make 5 Hearts. If he decides to show his second round control with 5 Spades, North will bid 6 Hearts. At this stage, however, the defenders know exactly what's going on and take their two Club tricks.

Suppose North instead decides to bid 4 No Trump. South will bid 5 Diamonds to show his one Ace. If North settles for for 5 Hearts, they make it as above. If he goes to 6 Hearts anyway, East has a harder lead. He knows that declarer is missing the Ace of Clubs and doesn't seem to care. He may lead something else, allowing declarer to make the slam.

Tricky business. A lot of players will settle for game, but DSS will just bid it and hope for the best.




East opens 1 Heart and West responds 1 Spade. East rebids 2 Hearts and West knows that his Heart support makes partner stronger. He raises to 4 Hearts and it makes with an overtrick for a flat score.